Men are being killed by their partners, and the cause of death recorded as suicide

Across the world the male suicide rate is markedly higher than the female suicide rate. You have to wonder how many men’s deaths are recorded as suicide, when the truth is they were murdered by their partners. A story from New Zealand:

http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/victim-s-family-never-forgive-evil-helen-milner-5827143

About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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  • Just a thought, but maybe look into suicides by men after divorce and after losing their children?I know of a few cases in India where men have committed suicide after harassment by their wives and the wives families(threatening with divorce,etc.), with the legal system also being biased in favor of women, although it’s technically suicide, it’s not much different than murder.Add to that suicides committed after false allegations.

    • Thanks Alex. We know that the male suicide rate after the end of long-term relationships is 9x higher than the female suicide rate. Denial of contact with children is undoubtedly a major contributor to this statistic. Our view is that men don’t commit suicide three times more often than women because of their personal failings, it’s because three times more men than women reach the point where life is (to them) objectively not worth continuing. Women ‘attempt’ suicide three times more often than men, but all the experts in this field I’ve spoken to are unanimous. Taking a few pills then calling the ambulance – the usual pattern for women ‘attempting suicide’ – is a call for help, not a genuine suicide attempt. Women in a crisis know society will support them, while men in a crisis soon learn (if they don’t know it already) that society won’t support THEM.