The consequences of feminising workplaces

I’ve written at length about the impact of feminising workplaces, as have others. I see that the government has just given £500 million of taxpayers’ money to Accident and Emergency departments to help them deal with their staffing ‘crisis’. But why is there a crisis in the first place? Because for 30+ years the state has been steadily driving up the proportion of medical students who are women. Today 70% of medical students are women. Two months ago Melanie Phillips wrote of the problems arising from women doctors in the NHS:

http://j4mb.org.uk/2013/06/10/melanie-phillips-on-female-doctors/

Female doctors are far more likely than male doctors to quit the profession, work part-time whether or not they have children, and are more likely to refuse to work unsocial hours and in the most stressful and demanding departments such as A&E.

It costs £250,000 to train a doctor. So what’s the Conservative-led coalition’s solution to the crisis? To increase the proportion of male medical students? Of course not. The ‘solution’ is to train more doctors, presumably 70% of them still women. Well, it’s only taxpayers’ money being flushed down the drain.

And what of the private sector? The American economist Milton Friedman wrote in Capitalism and Freedom (1962):

Few trends could so thoroughly undermine the very foundations of our free society as the acceptance by corporate officials of a social responsibility other than to make as much money for their stockholders as possible.

These days major companies are riddled with left-leaning executives and Corporate Social Responsibility (‘CSR’) consultants demanding they honour ever more onerous social responsibilities, regardless of the impact on the bottom line. Perhaps the most egregious practise is the relentless pandering to women in the workplace, whether it’s to increase the proportion of women on corporate boards – despite the compelling evidence that the consequence will be corporate financial decline – or to accommodate women’s needs and wishes to take time out of the workplace for child-related matters. Why should companies be any more accommodating of women in this area, than they would for men who wished to take significant time out of the workplace for other reasons?

And so it is that we have a relentless torrent of nonsensical pieces like this, almost always written by female reporters, male reporters seemingly unable to report on gender-related matters:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-23600465

The piece starts with:

“More than a quarter of mothers in the UK feel discriminated against at work, a survey suggests.

A third of 1,975 women questioned for legal firm Slater and Gordon said they found it impossible to climb the career ladder and 54% said their employer could do more to support working mums.

Yet 35% thought they worked harder since having children.

Employers said businesses were better than ever at managing maternity leave and reintegrating mothers.

A total of 35% of the mothers questioned by One Poll in July said their workplace was not supportive of their situation when they were pregnant and 31% felt they were not well treated by their employer while on maternity leave.

Some 27% said they had felt under pressure to return to work earlier than they wanted too.

Once back in the workplace, 29% felt they had been overlooked for a promotion because they had responsibilities as a mother.”

Only from a whining female perspective could these numbers be deemed problematical. Let’s flip the numbers to see why:

“Almost three-quarters of mothers in the UK didn’t feel discriminated against at work, a survey suggests.

Two-thirds of 1,975 women questioned for legal firm Slater and Gordon said they found it possible to climb the career ladder and 46% said their employer could do more to support working mums.

65% didn’t think they worked harder since having children.

Employers said businesses were better than ever at managing maternity leave and reintegrating mothers.

A total of 65% of the mothers questioned by One Poll in July said their workplace was supportive of their situation when they were pregnant and 69% felt they were well treated by their employer while on maternity leave.

Some 73% said they hadn’t felt under pressure to return to work earlier than they wanted too.

Once back in the workplace, 71% felt they hadn’t been overlooked for a promotion because they had responsibilities as a mother.”

About Mike Buchanan

I'm a men's human rights advocate, writer, and publisher. My primary focus is leading the political party I launched in 2013, Justice for Men & Boys (and the women who love them). I still work actively on two campaigns I launched in early 2012, Campaign for Merit in Business and the Anti-Feminism League. In 2014 I launched The Alternative Sexism Project, aiming to raise public understanding that the sexism faced by men and boys has far more grievous consequences than the sexism faced by women and girls.
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